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World Bank to Help Energy/Water Development Link

The World Bank is to help developing countries to better plan and scale-up their energy demand in tandem with water resource management.

The bank launched a new global initiative Thirsty Energy on 21 January 2014 at the World Future Energy Summit and International Water Summit in Abu Dhabi.

Last year, water shortages shut down thermal power plants in India, decreased energy production in power plants in the USA and threatened hydro power generation in many countries, including Sri Lanka, China and Brazil.

The problem is expected only to get worse. By 2035, the world's energy consumption will increase by 35%, which in turn will increase water consumption by 85%, according to the International Energy Agency.

Thirsty Energy is a global initiative aimed to help governments prepare for an uncertain future by:

n Identifying synergies and quantifying tradeoffs between energy development plans and water use
n Piloting cross-sectoral planning to ensure sustainability of energy and water investments
n Designing assessment tools and management frameworks to help governments coordinate decision-making.


With the energy sector as an entry point, initial work has already started in South Africa and dialogue has been initiated in Bangladesh, Morocco, and Brazil where the challenges have already manifested and thus where demand exists for integrated approaches.

"Water constraints on the energy sector can be overcome, but all stakeholders, public and private, must work together to develop innovative tools and use water as a guiding factor for assessing viability of projects," said Maria van der Hoeven, executive director of the International Energy Agency. "The absence of integrated planning is unsustainable."

Solutions exist, but countries must continue to innovate and adapt policies and technology to address the complexity of the landscape. These solutions include technological development and adoption, improved operations to reduce water use and impacts in water quality, and strong integrated planning.


Source: Desalination & Water Reuse
The Caribbean and also many offshore Islands worldwide experience sea water intrusion of fresh water wells. Wells that have provided potable and irrigation water for years are becoming unusable due to increasingly high salinity.



Sea Water Intrusion into Fresh Water Wells


Under natural conditions, the seaward movement of freshwater prevents saltwater from encroaching coastal aquifers, and the interface between freshwater and saltwater is maintained near the coast or far below land surface. This interface is actually a diffuse zone in which freshwater and saltwater mix, and is referred to as the zone of dispersion (or transition zone). Ground-water pumping can reduce freshwater flow toward coastal discharge areas and cause saltwater to be drawn toward the freshwater zones of the aquifer. Saltwater intrusion decreases freshwater storage in the aquifers, and, in extreme cases, can result in the abandonment of supply wells. Saltwater intrusion occurs by many mechanisms, including lateral encroachment from coastal waters and vertical up-coning near discharging wells. This problem occurs along coastal areas of all the major continents.

WTS Desalination Plant Powered by Wind Turbines


WTS, Inc.has proposed a new fresh water production facility for an Island population off the coast of Africa.  The plant will be housed in a number of 40’ shipping containers to produce 4,500m3 of fresh water daily.  The plant will be powered by its own 750kW wind generator and backup thermal (diesel/bio diesel) generator, and tied to the island’s existing electrical grid for redundancy and continual operation for consistent supply of fresh water.  This arrangement of the desalinization plant, combined with its wind and thermal power plants, has been specifically sized in order to create a ‘modular’ configuration which can be duplicated in other areas of the country.  By using this modular approach WTS, Inc. can provide great economies for the islands in terms of scale and redundancy of design, inter-interoperability across multiple plants, cross-training of operating personnel and the supply of spare parts for immediate repairs.  The integral design also allows fresh water production to be increased during times of excess wind energy and stored, thus acting as a cost effective ‘battery’ for the wind energy.



19 New Alternative Water Supply Projects In South Florida

In Florida, the South Florida Water Management District, which manages the state's water resources, provides Grants to cities and private entities for development and use of alternative water sources for irrigation or potable water that otherwise might not be usable. The Floridan Aquifer, a highly brackish water supply located beneath most of Florida can now be utilized using Reverse Osmosis.It has just been announced that the SFWMD has approved providing $3.45 million for 19 projects across the region. These projects combined will provide an additional 6.5 million gallons per day of water supply capacity. The projects are intended to help the environment and the economy, said Terrie Bates assistant deputy executive director for regulatory and public affairs at the district. She also said "the investment in alternative water supply projects is an investment in Florida's' future".The money will be spread throughout the district. In Boca Raton, $175,000 will be used for a 16-inch reclaimed water distribution ssystem expansion along Airport Road. Davie, in Broward County, will receive $200,000 to help fund a 6 million gallon per day reverse osmosis water treatment plant. Alternative water projects help to reduce dependence on traditional freshwater resources and diversify South Florida's water supply.

RO Zero Liquid Discharge at Texas Golf Club  

Water Treatment Systems, Inc. has begun the first phase of manufacture for a 1,000,000 GPD reverse osmosis based water treatment plant that will feature (nearly) "Zero Liquid Discharge" of the waste water concentrate from the RO systems. RO concentrate water that is to be discharged to a sewer system has been reduced to only approximately 28,000 GPD. That is a design recovery of greater than 97%.

This is a very important development for the RO and also for the Golf industries. In many parts of the country, and indeed worldwide, golf course managers struggle with the problems of availability, cost or quality of water for irrigation of their golf course. "Reverse Osmosis has solved the problem of utilizing brackish ground water and many Golf Clubs have planned to purchase and install their own RO water treatment plants only to run directly into a very major obstacle. The problem is finding a suitable location to send the RO concentrate water and obtaining the necessary permits. RO concentrate water is considered 'industrial waste' by the DER and EPA." The lower the amount of RO concentrate, the smaller the problem is.

Reverse Osmosis systems are currently desalinating brackish or sea water at dozens of gold course facilities in the USA and world-wide. The product water from RO systems is very good "irrigation" quality. These facilities discharge their concentrate water, usually about 25% of the feed water, to an appropriate and permittable location. For a one million gallon per day RO system, this can be 250,000 gallons per day. A great many golf course facilities that need to treat their available water do not have an approved location to discharge it to.

The original design for the Texas Golf Course called for total liquid discharge with the use of evaporators as the final treatment phase. Evaporators are expensive both in capital and operating cost. But our client was fortunate to obtain permitting for approximately 5% of the concentrate thus eliminating the evaporation phase which saved about a million dollars". The WTS (nearly) zero liquid discharge design using membrane systems is a low cost opportunity for golf clubs everywhere.

Water Recovery RO Systems Provide Environmental Sustainability  

Once thought of as only contaminant removal systems, Reverse Osmosis systems are helping industry save water that would otherwise be sent to the sewer drain. For the beverage bottling industry, RO "Re-Use" systems provide sustainable, reliable cost-effective solutions to meet the industries stringent water specifications. Much of a process plants "waste" water ends up going to municipal sewer systems. Most municipal systems mandate effluent content limitations on Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD), Total Suspended Solids (TOD) and Acidity (pH) as well as total volume. Should the effluent exceed establish limits, and they often do, penalties in the form of surcharges are imposed. With so much water going down the drain it makes sense for bottling plants to reduce their reject water with Reverse Osmosis based "Re-Use" systems. It is another way that plants can save money while reducing their impact on the environment. Case study: Water Treatment Systems.us, has supplied a low-cost, membrane process system for Shasta Corporation's Miami Bottling plant for the purpose of recovering thousands of gallons of process water that would otherwise be discharged to the city sewer system. The Miami Bottling facility had been exceeding its permittable discharge limits and, as a result, been paying thousands of dollars in fees to the Miami-Dade Sewer Authority. The WMG, Inc. "Reuse" system was designed to recover approximately 75% of previously treated water used for bottling soft drinks and bottled water products. For this facility, the cost of the equipment will be repaid in less than a year due to the cash savings that would have otherwise been spent on discharge fees. Additional savings come from the reuse of the product water from the WMG "Reuse" system. The water quality produced by the WTS system is so good that it is reused in the facility in several ways resulting in additional savings for Shasta. The water quality from the "Reuse" system is so good that the recovered water can be reused for process water and/or plant utilities. Beverage bottling companies, with similar circumstances, no longer need to discharge huge amounts of "good" quality water to city sewer and pay thousands of dollars in fees.


CONSULTING               DESIGN            BUILD              SERVICE

Antiscalant Chemicals for Reverse Osmosis Systems

California Approves First Statewide Seawater Desalination Rules

By Sharon Bernstein

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (Reuters) - California regulators on Wednesday adopted the first statewide rules for the permitting of seawater desalination projects that are expected to proliferate as drought-stricken communities increasingly turn to the ocean to supplement their drinking supplies.

The action, which sets uniform standards for minimizing harm to marine life, was welcomed by developers of the state's two largest desalination projects as bringing much-needed certainty and clarity to the regulatory approval process.

"It reaffirms that the Pacific Ocean is part of the drinking water resources for the state of California," Poseidon Water executive Scott Maloni told Reuters after the rule was enacted on a voice vote in Sacramento by the State Water Resources Control Board.

The measure leaves the permitting process in the hands of the state's regional water boards while establishing a single framework for them to follow in evaluating applications to build seawater treatment plants, expand existing ones and renew old permits.

But regional decisions could now be appealed to the state board for review if opponents of a project felt a permit was wrongly approved.

Before Wednesday's action, developers and regulators of desalination plants had no specific guidance for meeting federal and state clean water standards, complicating review of the projects, state water board spokesman George Kostyrko said.

Desalination has emerged as a promising technology in the face of a record dry spell now gripping California for a fourth straight year, depleting its reservoirs and aquifers and raising the costs of importing water from elsewhere.

Critics have cited ecological drawbacks, such as harm to marine life from intake pipes that suck water into the treatment systems and the concentrated brine discharge from the plants.

The newly approved plan sets specific brine salinity limits and rules for diffusing the discharge as it is pumped back into to the ocean.

It also requires seawater to be drawn into the plants through pipes that are sunk into beach wells or buried beneath the sea floor, where possible. Such subsurface intakes are viewed as more environmentally friendly.

World Bank to Help Energy/Water Development Link

The World Bank is to help developing countries to better plan and scale-up their energy demand in tandem with water resource management.

The bank launched a new global initiative Thirsty Energy on 21 January 2014 at the World Future Energy Summit and International Water Summit in Abu Dhabi.

Last year, water shortages shut down thermal power plants in India, decreased energy production in power plants in the USA and threatened hydro power generation in many countries, including Sri Lanka, China and Brazil.

The problem is expected only to get worse. By 2035, the world's energy consumption will increase by 35%, which in turn will increase water consumption by 85%, according to the International Energy Agency.

Thirsty Energy is a global initiative aimed to help governments prepare for an uncertain future by:

n Identifying synergies and quantifying tradeoffs between energy development plans and water use
n Piloting cross-sectoral planning to ensure sustainability of energy and water investments
n Designing assessment tools and management frameworks to help governments coordinate decision-making.


With the energy sector as an entry point, initial work has already started in South Africa and dialogue has been initiated in Bangladesh, Morocco, and Brazil where the challenges have already manifested and thus where demand exists for integrated approaches.

"Water constraints on the energy sector can be overcome, but all stakeholders, public and private, must work together to develop innovative tools and use water as a guiding factor for assessing viability of projects," said Maria van der Hoeven, executive director of the International Energy Agency. "The absence of integrated planning is unsustainable."

Solutions exist, but countries must continue to innovate and adapt policies and technology to address the complexity of the landscape. These solutions include technological development and adoption, improved operations to reduce water use and impacts in water quality, and strong integrated planning.


Source: Desalination & Water Reuse
The Caribbean and also many offshore Islands worldwide experience sea water intrusion of fresh water wells. Wells that have provided potable and irrigation water for years are becoming unusable due to increasingly high salinity.



Sea Water Intrusion into Fresh Water Wells


Under natural conditions, the seaward movement of freshwater prevents saltwater from encroaching coastal aquifers, and the interface between freshwater and saltwater is maintained near the coast or far below land surface. This interface is actually a diffuse zone in which freshwater and saltwater mix, and is referred to as the zone of dispersion (or transition zone). Ground-water pumping can reduce freshwater flow toward coastal discharge areas and cause saltwater to be drawn toward the freshwater zones of the aquifer. Saltwater intrusion decreases freshwater storage in the aquifers, and, in extreme cases, can result in the abandonment of supply wells. Saltwater intrusion occurs by many mechanisms, including lateral encroachment from coastal waters and vertical up-coning near discharging wells. This problem occurs along coastal areas of all the major continents.

WTS Desalination Plant Powered by Wind Turbines


WTS, Inc.has proposed a new fresh water production facility for an Island population off the coast of Africa.  The plant will be housed in a number of 40’ shipping containers to produce 4,500m3 of fresh water daily.  The plant will be powered by its own 750kW wind generator and backup thermal (diesel/bio diesel) generator, and tied to the island’s existing electrical grid for redundancy and continual operation for consistent supply of fresh water.  This arrangement of the desalinization plant, combined with its wind and thermal power plants, has been specifically sized in order to create a ‘modular’ configuration which can be duplicated in other areas of the country.  By using this modular approach WTS, Inc. can provide great economies for the islands in terms of scale and redundancy of design, inter-interoperability across multiple plants, cross-training of operating personnel and the supply of spare parts for immediate repairs.  The integral design also allows fresh water production to be increased during times of excess wind energy and stored, thus acting as a cost effective ‘battery’ for the wind energy.



19 New Alternative Water Supply Projects In South Florida

In Florida, the South Florida Water Management District, which manages the state's water resources, provides Grants to cities and private entities for development and use of alternative water sources for irrigation or potable water that otherwise might not be usable. The Floridan Aquifer, a highly brackish water supply located beneath most of Florida can now be utilized using Reverse Osmosis.It has just been announced that the SFWMD has approved providing $3.45 million for 19 projects across the region. These projects combined will provide an additional 6.5 million gallons per day of water supply capacity. The projects are intended to help the environment and the economy, said Terrie Bates assistant deputy executive director for regulatory and public affairs at the district. She also said "the investment in alternative water supply projects is an investment in Florida's' future".The money will be spread throughout the district. In Boca Raton, $175,000 will be used for a 16-inch reclaimed water distribution ssystem expansion along Airport Road. Davie, in Broward County, will receive $200,000 to help fund a 6 million gallon per day reverse osmosis water treatment plant. Alternative water projects help to reduce dependence on traditional freshwater resources and diversify South Florida's water supply.

RO Zero Liquid Discharge at Texas Golf Club  

Water Treatment Systems, Inc. has begun the first phase of manufacture for a 1,000,000 GPD reverse osmosis based water treatment plant that will feature (nearly) "Zero Liquid Discharge" of the waste water concentrate from the RO systems. RO concentrate water that is to be discharged to a sewer system has been reduced to only approximately 28,000 GPD. That is a design recovery of greater than 97%.

This is a very important development for the RO and also for the Golf industries. In many parts of the country, and indeed worldwide, golf course managers struggle with the problems of availability, cost or quality of water for irrigation of their golf course. "Reverse Osmosis has solved the problem of utilizing brackish ground water and many Golf Clubs have planned to purchase and install their own RO water treatment plants only to run directly into a very major obstacle. The problem is finding a suitable location to send the RO concentrate water and obtaining the necessary permits. RO concentrate water is considered 'industrial waste' by the DER and EPA." The lower the amount of RO concentrate, the smaller the problem is.

Reverse Osmosis systems are currently desalinating brackish or sea water at dozens of gold course facilities in the USA and world-wide. The product water from RO systems is very good "irrigation" quality. These facilities discharge their concentrate water, usually about 25% of the feed water, to an appropriate and permittable location. For a one million gallon per day RO system, this can be 250,000 gallons per day. A great many golf course facilities that need to treat their available water do not have an approved location to discharge it to.

The original design for the Texas Golf Course called for total liquid discharge with the use of evaporators as the final treatment phase. Evaporators are expensive both in capital and operating cost. But our client was fortunate to obtain permitting for approximately 5% of the concentrate thus eliminating the evaporation phase which saved about a million dollars". The WTS (nearly) zero liquid discharge design using membrane systems is a low cost opportunity for golf clubs everywhere.

Water Recovery RO Systems Provide Environmental Sustainability  

Once thought of as only contaminant removal systems, Reverse Osmosis systems are helping industry save water that would otherwise be sent to the sewer drain. For the beverage bottling industry, RO "Re-Use" systems provide sustainable, reliable cost-effective solutions to meet the industries stringent water specifications. Much of a process plants "waste" water ends up going to municipal sewer systems. Most municipal systems mandate effluent content limitations on Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD), Total Suspended Solids (TOD) and Acidity (pH) as well as total volume. Should the effluent exceed establish limits, and they often do, penalties in the form of surcharges are imposed. With so much water going down the drain it makes sense for bottling plants to reduce their reject water with Reverse Osmosis based "Re-Use" systems. It is another way that plants can save money while reducing their impact on the environment. Case study: Water Treatment Systems.us, has supplied a low-cost, membrane process system for Shasta Corporation's Miami Bottling plant for the purpose of recovering thousands of gallons of process water that would otherwise be discharged to the city sewer system. The Miami Bottling facility had been exceeding its permittable discharge limits and, as a result, been paying thousands of dollars in fees to the Miami-Dade Sewer Authority. The WMG, Inc. "Reuse" system was designed to recover approximately 75% of previously treated water used for bottling soft drinks and bottled water products. For this facility, the cost of the equipment will be repaid in less than a year due to the cash savings that would have otherwise been spent on discharge fees. Additional savings come from the reuse of the product water from the WMG "Reuse" system. The water quality produced by the WTS system is so good that it is reused in the facility in several ways resulting in additional savings for Shasta. The water quality from the "Reuse" system is so good that the recovered water can be reused for process water and/or plant utilities. Beverage bottling companies, with similar circumstances, no longer need to discharge huge amounts of "good" quality water to city sewer and pay thousands of dollars in fees.


CONSULTING               DESIGN            BUILD              SERVICE

Antiscalant Chemicals for Reverse Osmosis Systems
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